A family on the road living fulltime in an RV.

Tag: National Parks

Exploring Cape Hatteras National Seashore and the Outer Banks

The Outer Banks in North Carolina is not only a place where you can watch sunrise and sunset from the beach but a place rich in beauty, history, and recreation….

The Outer Banks in North Carolina is not only a place where you can watch sunrise and sunset from the beach but a place rich in beauty, history, and recreation.

The drive to the Outer Banks was long. As we drove through the seemingly endless wetlands, we counted basking turtles on the logs to pass time.

Fort Raleigh National Historic Site

See the Jr. Rangers in the background?

We started at the Outer Banks Visitor Center and found out Fort Raleigh National Historic Site was just a few miles away. Fort Raleigh was the first English settlement in North America. (St. Augustine is the oldest continuously occupied city.) It is better known as The Lost Colony because the fate of the 116 settlers has never been determined.

In 1587, Sir Walter Raleigh appointed John White to lead a group of settlers to sail for Chesapeake Bay in hopes of starting a colony.  However, they stopped on Roanoke Island and, for unknown reasons, they were forced to stay by the ship’s captain.

The colonists’ attempt to build relationships with the Indians failed due to conflicts with English explorers the previous year. After one of the colonist was killed by an Indian they persuaded John White to go back to England to ask for help. White departed leaving his family behind including his newborn granddaughter, Virginia Dare, the first English child born in North America. Due to circumstances beyond his control, he was unable to return to Roanoke for three years. When he made it back to Roanoke in 1590, he found the island deserted, hence, the name The Lost Colony.

Ocracoke Island and Ferry

Ocracoke Island lies at the end of the Outer Banks.

We took a free car ferry from Hatteras Island to Ocracoke.

The best way to see Ocracoke Island is by bike.

We biked past the harbor…

…to the Ocracoke Lighthouse.

We also went on a short hike to and had ice cream before returning home.

Riding the Ocracoke Ferry back to Hatteras. 

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and National Seashore

Cape Hatteras National Seashore stretches over 70 miles and whispers tales of shipwrecks, pirates, and treasure.

It is also the home to the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. With 248 stairs, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is the tallest lighthouse in North America.

Unfortunately, we missed its opening by two days. Two days. We considered staying but knew we had to press on.

 

We built sandcastles along the Atlantic’s edge.

And found seashells.

And filmed another kettlebell workout.

And watched sunsets.

I hope the boys always remember how much we love each other.

And our silliness.

You can watch the sunrise over the Atlantic and the sunset over the sound.

Wright Brothers National Memorial

A little over 300 years after The Lost Colony, the Outer Banks claimed another first.

The first flight was made by Wilbur and Orville Wright at Kitty Hawk. We spent the afternoon at the Wright Brothers National Memorial marveling how much world change hinged on that cold December morning in 1903.

It was inspiring.

See the white markers to the right of Thing Two? That’s how far the first three flights went – 120 feet, 175 feet, and 200 feet. The fourth marker is further out at 852 feet.

I found myself praying that our boys would share the same sort of camaraderie and friendship that the Wright brothers shared. I’m still waiting for that miracle.

We weren’t the only ones contemplating flight…so was Nigel.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Escaping to Charleston While Waiting in Yemassee

While we were in Key West Thing Two tripped on a curb while carrying our camera and broke the lens. Uh-oh. Normally, I would have to try hard to hide…

While we were in Key West Thing Two tripped on a curb while carrying our camera and broke the lens.

Uh-oh.

Normally, I would have to try hard to hide my annoyance at such an accident. However, this time I had to try to hide my delight. I finally had an excuse to get rid of that terrible kit lens.

After much research (I research the heck out of anything that costs over $20) we decided on a new lens to purchase and where to have it shipped. Unfortunately, we had it shipped the most mosquito infested campground in all of South Carolina.

What would have been a quick stop over en route to Charleston, SC turned into seven long days of waiting in Yemassee. Our 32o square feet of space started to feel like 320 square inches.

One day, we explored nearby Beaufort visiting Kazoobie Kazoos, farmers markets, and having a picnic along the water. However kazoos can only entertain for so long and they don’t offer any defense against mosquitoes.

After three days of waiting in Yemassee, we decided we would skip camping near Charleston and just make the hour and a half drive over for the day.

Fort Moultrie is on nearby Sullivan’s Island, so we started there. I would go to the moon if it meant I could get my National Park Passport stamp. The boys completed their Junior Ranger booklets and thus fullfilling the requirements to earn the Junior Ranger Civil War Historian sesquicentennial patch. The Junior Ranger Civil War Historian is a special program for kids commemorating the Civil War’s 150th anniversary.

After Fort Moultrie, we headed back over the bridge to spend the rest of the day wandering the streets of Charleston. We walked through the city market, to Vendue Wharf Pier, and down small streets taking in the architecture. We bought a walking tour guide but the boys were history-ed out and I had PMS. Bad combo. Let’s just say the guide didn’t get much use unless you think of it as a flat 2 ounce shot put.

I hope southerners don’t hate me for saying this but Charleston is Savannah’s more sophisticated twin. Savannah is charming and quaint.  Charleston, while charming, feels more urban and upscale. We spent nearly 30 minutes sitting on the steps of a building, faces buried in our phones, searching for shrimp and grits that weren’t going to cost us $30+ a person.

Finally, we decided to try Jestine’s Kitchen. Jestine’s was just a few blocks away, had good reviews, and was within our budget.

Apparently, we weren’t the only ones wanting southern cookin’. The line wrapped around the building and down the street.

Surprisingly the line moved fast. The service was friendly and the food fantastic.

After dinner we headed to Battery Park to look at the old mansions. Right away we realized we had made a mistake by waiting until after dark. I would have loved to see the beautiful mansions during the day but apparently blinds aren’t a priority so we got  glimpse of the gorgeous interiors instead.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Savannah, GA

Savannah is a beautiful name. It’s a perfect name for one of the prettiest towns we’ve stepped foot in and stepped foot we did. Self-guided tours seem to be the best…

Savannah is a beautiful name. It’s a perfect name for one of the prettiest towns we’ve stepped foot in and stepped foot we did.

Self-guided tours seem to be the best option for our family. It gives us the freedom to set our own pace and allows time for pitstops like watching the taffy machine at the Savannah’s Candy Kitchen in the City Market. It also allows more room in the budget for eating out. Our Savannah splurge of the day was at Paula Deen’s restaurant, The Lady and Sons.

The bookstore in the Visitor Center sold a lovely walking tour guide that included four different easy to follow tours with historical descriptions and color photos. We did the “Along the Riverfront” and “The Booming West Side” walking tours. The boys held up really well but by the end of the day they were spent. We decided to ride “The Dot” for one last look at the town before calling it quits for the day

While in Savannah, we stayed in nearby Skidaway State Park. We enjoyed biking along the trails (I only got us a little lost this time.) and walking under the trees. While on a walk one evening, we met another family who was en route to Bahai Honda on a three month adventure with their two boys. A few hours later, we were sharing a meal in our camper over stories and laughter.

Unexpected things like this are, by far, the best part of living fulltime on the road.

Before we left the Savannah area, we visited Fort Pulaski on Cockspur Island. Fort Pulaski was built to protect Savannah from a river approach. We took a Ranger Guided tour and explored. The boys completed their Jr. Ranger booklets and earned new badges to add to their growing collection.

Our Savannah GA Experience at a Glance

Where we stayed:

  • Skidaway Island State Park – Skidaway Island State park is beautiful, reasonably priced, and not far from historic Savannah. We had a strong internet connection and cell service.

What we did:

  • Toured Savannah by foot using a walking tour guide we bought at Savannah Vistor Center. Savannah is the perfect kind of town to explore by foot.
  • Rode the Dot, a free bus. We rode the entire line to get a good view of the town and got off once to see The Cathedral of St. John the Baptist and I was excited to see Flannery O’Connor’s Childhood on the same square.
  • Rode the free Savannah Belles Ferry (Part of the dot system) – It was a short ride but offered a different perspective of Savannah. It was fun to imagine what it might of been like coming into the town by boat.
  • Visited Fort Pulaski National Monument  (I wish we would have had time to visit nearby Tybee Island.)

Where we ate:

  • The Lady and Sons – Unfortunately, Brent and I didn’t think it was worth the price or the wait. At the suggestion of our waiter, I ordered the chicken pot pie. I disliked it so much that Brent, always the sweetheart, offered to trade me for his crab cakes. The crab cakes were just okay. The boys ordered the buffet and after stealing a few bites from their plates, Brent and I wished we would have ordered the same. The chocolate butter cake, however, was divine.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Florida by Instagram

One last glimpse of Florida on the blog before we move on to Georgia. I miss those sandy white beaches and majestic sunsets already. Dear Family (and anyone else who…

One last glimpse of Florida on the blog before we move on to Georgia.

I miss those sandy white beaches and majestic sunsets already.

Dear Family (and anyone else who cares),

I’m trying to keep up with our adventures but with homeschooling, sight seeing, driving, and life stuff. I’m finding it difficult to find the time. If you have an iPhone or Android I’m posting regularly on Instagram. My instagram name is newschoolnomad_girlhero.

I’m also trying to pin cute dresses places we have gone or want to go on Pinterest.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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St. Augustine Florida – Rich in History

St. Augustine is the oldest city in the United States. It’s actually the oldest continuously occupied city of European and African descent in the United States if you want to get specific….

St. Augustine is the oldest city in the United States. It’s actually the oldest continuously occupied city of European and African descent in the United States if you want to get specific.

St. Augustine was founded by the Spanish in 1565 and is a must see for any family touring the US in an RV studying American history.

Being the planner I am, I didn’t make reservations for Anastasia State Park located near St. Augustine. In all fairness, I didn’t hear about Anastastia State Park until we got to Florida and since reservations typically need to be made up to 11 months in advance, it was too late. However what I lack in planning, I make up for in persistence.

For three weeks, I checked the Florida State Park multiple times a day for site for cancellations at Anastastia. I didn’t get as lucky as I did with Bahai Honda but I did get us a spot for one night. Two nights would have been nice but one worked out due the free RV parking behind the St Augustine visitor center. The one problem with pulling a 5th wheel is that it’s not easy to find a place to park. The free parking allowed us to have two full days to explore St. Augustine.

We are parents a family who loves to explore on foot. Not too big and not too small St. Augustine is the perfect size town for walking. We wandered down the streets lined with old houses and cemeteries following a route suggested to us at the St. Augustine Vistor Center.

While Ponce de Leon might have been the first European to discover St. Augustine, oil tychoon, Henry Flagler (remember him from the railroad in Bahai Honda?) played a large role in making St. Augustine the destination it is today. In 1888, Henry Flagler built the Ponce de Leon, a grand hotel desinged in the Spanish Renaissance style. The hotel is now part of Flagler College but you can still walk through and get a glimse of what it would have been like to be part of the elite during the turn of the 20th century.

Not far from the old Ponce de Leon hotel, is another building built by Henry Flagler, the Memorial Presbyterian church which houses the Flagler family’s mausoleum. The Memorial Presbyterian church was Florida’s first Presbyterian congregation established in 1824. We enjoyed the Venetian Renaissance style, especially Thing One who has developed quite an interest in old churches.

The star (literally since it’s foundation is star shaped) of St Augustine is Castillo de San Marcos. While Thing One was in his element as the Memorial Presbyterian church, Thing Two was no less in his element looking at cannons at the fort. What we thought would be a quick visit to the fort ended up being a three hour exploration complete with a cannon firing. Both boys earned  their Jr. Rangers badge. They are racking up quite the collection.

Of course there is more to see in St. Augustine besides old buildings and cannons. There are museums, a lighthouse, restaurants, and shops. A favorite shop of the boys was the St. Augustine Textiles Colonial Goods Merchant, a local shop with a large assortment of handmade period clothing and goods. While St. Augustine is clearly a tourist destination it still boasts a lot of charm as the lady at the visitor center proudly pointed out “there isn’t one chain restaurant downtown”.

Anastasia State Park was as beautiful as I hoped it would be. The sites were private and lush. We really wished we could have spent more time there despite getting yelled at for “harassing a tortoise”. Thing Two was only trying to feed it a blade of grass not poke it. In the evening, the boys sat under the canopy of green at out picnic table and practiced writing with their new quill pens. (Ahem. Homeschoolers) Quill pens have become their new obsession. Thankfully they take up less space than wooden rifles.

Our Visit to St. Augustine in a Glance

Where We Stayed

  • Anastasia State Park. It was beautiful and we had a good internet connect. If you want to stay at Anastasia it would be a good idea to make reservations as soon as you are able.
The Highlights
Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Alligators in the Everglades

Vultures, gators, and crocs! Oh my! (How I would love ruby red hiking boots.) Alligators in the Everglades National Park. Reservations for the Flamingo campground at Everglades National Park are…

Vultures, gators, and crocs! Oh my!
(How I would love ruby red hiking boots.)

Alligators in the Everglades National Park.

Reservations for the Flamingo campground at Everglades National Park are “strongly recommended“. Do you think we make reservations?

Of course not.

We just drove up to the gate hoping there would be a spot for us.  Just like we hoped we would pass a grocery along the way. Luckily for us, we did pass a grocery. Sort of. We passed a produce stand called Robert is Here. Thankfully Robert had eggs and heavenly milkshakes. (The canistel milkshake is ecstasy.) I could live off of eggs and milkshakes.

What were we talking about? Certainly not about our lack of planning or milkshakes.

Oh yes, the Everglades National Park. As it turned out there was a space for us in the Flamingo Campground. Our spot didn’t have electricity, water, or sewer but that along with mosquitoes —holy moly do not forget bug spray— just makes it feel all the more adventurous. I guess.

The everglades can be as adventerous as you want them to be. The really insane adventurous types can go camping in the backcountry with bears, panthers, and very large exotic reptiles. You’ve heard about the Burmese pythons that are showing up in the park? Less adventurous types can stick to the visitor centers and Anhinga trail. Both which are awesome and shouldn’t be missed no matter where you fall on the adventure scale.

As for us, we are somewhere in the middle on the adventure scale. To up our adventure factor, we rented a canoe and went on the Nine Mile Pond Canoe Trail. It’s a sort of marked trail that winds through mangrove tunnels and sprawling swamps where the clouds seem to rest on the water.  We also saw the real star of the Everglades, the American alligator. In fact, we saw eight of them. Most of them would sink to the bottom or lay very still, their leathery black skin peaking through the surface like an old tire as we paddled slowly past. However, there was one “friendly” gator who began to swim toward us as we drifted many yards from him. Her? I’m certain I saw it opening and closing its mouth underneath the water. Needless to say, we didn’t stick around.

Later gator.

Back at Flamingo I described the “curious” gator’s behavior to a ranger. The ranger replied, as matter of fact-ly as if he was an appliance repairman, “Yep that sounds like aggressive behavior. It is mating season.” Might have been good to know. It’s also possible that some stupid people are feeding the gators and he was just looking for a hand out.

Here is a video Thing One took. (He also wrote a post for the Wandering Educators Youth Travel Blogging Mentorship program which he is now a part of.)

Anyway….

Not only did we see alligators but we also saw an American crocodile, (South Florida is the only place in the world where both alligators and crocodiles live together.), manatees, turtles, and birds. Oh so many birds. Anhinga trail is the place to go to view wildlife from the comfort of a paved and railed path. We saw so many alligators we lost count. If it’s crocodiles and manatees you’re looking for head down to the marina at Flamingo.

And don’t forget your bug spray.

Our Everglades Experience at a glance.

Where We Stayed

  • Flamingo Campground – They do have a limited number of sites with electrical.  There is a wonderful paved bike path that runs from the campground to the Flamingo Visitor Center. We didn’t get any internet service here. We expected this and since Brent works from the road we visited over a weekend.

The Highlights

  • There are a number of ranger guided programs and tours. We wanted to go on the ranger led canoe tour but it was full. However, I think we ended up having more fun renting our own canoe and going at our own pace. I was concerned about not learning from the ranger but she assured me that she doesn’t do that much talking due to the logistics of a “canoe train”.
  • Anhinga Trail – A paved half of mile trail at Royal Palm. We stopped on our way out. The boys were complaining about another stop but ended up enjoying it. We said it would only be a few minutes and ended up staying a few hours. Typical. Recommend the ranger alligator talk if it’s available.
  • Ernest Coe Visitor Center – We should have stopped here on our way in as opposed to out. There are great exhibits, air conditioning, and a movie. (There are also 2 more visitor centers in the park that we missed.)

Where We Ate

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Escaping Reality at Fort Pickens, Florida

Our visit to the Gulf Islands National Seashore was brief. So brief it must have been a dream. It is only in dreams you can convince a grumpy-die-by-the-rules ranger to let…

Our visit to the Gulf Islands National Seashore was brief. So brief it must have been a dream. It is only in dreams you can convince a grumpy-die-by-the-rules ranger to let you in the campground without reservations after the gate has closed at dusk.

It is only in dreams you see turbulent clouds dancing with shadows on white sand beaches. It is only in dreams you hear driftwood silently whistling to the tune of time.

We explored Fort Pickens early morning discovering history in her shadows and mystery in her corridors. Thing Two was on the lookout for approaching enemies. Thing One considered the structural elements and their uses. By the time the sun had made her full ascent, we were piling into the truck and heading east.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Charm and Carousel Horses in Meridian, Mississippi

When I think of the south I think of plantations, sweet tea, and alligators. I also think of southern charm. And Missy. Missy is a sweet charming southern girl who…

When I think of the south I think of plantations, sweet tea, and alligators.

I also think of southern charm. And Missy.

Missy is a sweet charming southern girl who I met through blogging. When Missy heard we were in the south she gave us some suggestions of what to see. It was Missy who recommended Tannehill Historical State Park. She also recommended we stop in Tuscaloosa Alabama for Dreamland BBQ and to see the devastation left by the tornado.

I was delighted when I found out her town, Meridian,  Mississippi, was on our route to New Orleans and we would get to meet in person. Our budget stretched tight, we stayed at beautiful Lake Okatibbee for $7 a night using our Passport America membership. We spent the first part of our day following our typical morning routine, school. Then in afternoon, the boys and I ventured out to downtown Meridian to meet Missy and explore the town. Missy treated us to drinks and dessert at Jen’s Place. Afterwards, we walked around the downtown getting a quick peek into the Meridian Railroad Museum and enjoying the many carousel horses scattered around the city as part of public art project. The proceeds from the Around the Town Carousel project benefit Hope Village for Children. Why carousel horses? Meridian is home to the last remaining Dentzel Carousel House, a national landmark, located in Highland Park.

The next morning, we decided to visit Highland Park before hitting the road. Unfortunately, the carousel is closed on weekdays during the winter but Missy called the park just to be sure. Much to our delight, the carousel was being shown to someone who was planning an event there and the planner said we could come on down for a peek. The peek turned into a private tour and ride! Talk about southern hospitality! The carousel is beautiful and as we spun around I couldn’t help but think of the generations who had ridden before me. It is definitely worth a stop for those traveling through Meridian.

Thanks Missy for your hospitality and recommendations. Thankful you could be a part of our adventure!

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Day 90: Great Smokey Mountain National Park

The Great Smokey Mountains National Park is the first national park I can remember visiting. Although I think my first national park visit was really to the Grand Canyon when…

The Great Smokey Mountains National Park is the first national park I can remember visiting. Although I think my first national park visit was really to the Grand Canyon when my parents looked like hipsters and drove a van. A real van with a moon shaped window and an airbrushed mural. I probably rode on my mom’s lap while she warmed my baby food in the dashboard window.

We aren’t as cool as my parents were. We drive a big white diesel Chevy  that hasn’t been washed since October.  But at least we use seat belts.

The Great Smokey Mountains is the first park I can remember visiting. I remember the river churning with rapids as white as doves but as unpredictable as cats. I remember the mountains poking out of the clouds like giant tombstones in a foggy cemetery. I remember my teenage self getting ticked about something and pouting on the Appalachian trail. I probably didn’t get to curl my bangs that morning.

I didn’t remember  John Ownby’s cabin. Or the history. I didn’t remember the land was originally home to the Cherokee Indians who were driven out. I didn’t remember settlers were evicted from their homes and lives to make create the park we now visit.

So many old and new memories being pulled or created and stashed in this already challenged brain of mine.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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Clueless or Cozy?

We decided to wait out the storm. Alone. The morning of the storm we noticed the other three campers in the campground were packing up. By noon, the snow started…

We decided to wait out the storm. Alone. The morning of the storm we noticed the other three campers in the campground were packing up. By noon, the snow started falling and ice- the real problem- started forming on the roads.

So we waited because we are clueless we thought it would be cozy and (much to my amazement) it was. It was also cold, really cold, but that didn’t stop us from having little adventures.

Arrowheads and coins in a red handkerchief. So simple, so little boy, so sweet that it almost makes me cry. And stop time. Please God.

I think it’s time for these guys and us to start flying south.

Love and Laughter,
Jenn

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